Tag Archives: gear

Fujifilm X100F with WCL, TCL and digital zoom

The Fujifilm Finepix X100F (Affiliate link) – briefly X100F – is Fujifilms fourth (=F) iteration of the cult camera X100. The Web and YouTube are full of praise and emotional love letters for the X100. It is a camera that wants to be touched, picked up, handled, used. It looks gorgeous yet harmless and inconspicuous. The classical controls, with an aperture ring on the lens, a shutter speed dial and a dedicated exposure compensation dial, and numerous configurable buttons let experienced photographers cheer. No PASM dial, no cryptical multi-function dials, everything is immediately “there”.

Continue reading Fujifilm X100F with WCL, TCL and digital zoom

B/W photography with the MS Super Triplet 3.5/35 mm Perar lens, adapted to a Sony NEX-7

I recently purchased a very special lens that is hand made in Japan in very limited quantities. Individual lenses are numbered and the serial number is engraved in the front ring (mine is a Mark II design and version, serial no. #433). It comes with a Leica M mount, which can easily be adapted to the Sony E-mount and fits the Sony NEX series. The lens is tiny – it will hardly get any smaller. The aperture ring has no discrete stops and needs quite some force to be moved, which inevitably will change the focus ring as well. The focus ring, however, moves smoothly with just the right force.
39530720 fd61b5bdd8ba4721e394d5a7e3360c1071249a92e0f1c006c79497f94936e77a
(The MS Optical Super Triplet adapted to the NEX-7.)

Continue reading B/W photography with the MS Super Triplet 3.5/35 mm Perar lens, adapted to a Sony NEX-7

Some thoughts about adapting legacy lenses (Part 1)

Some thoughts about adapting legacy lenses (Part 1)

Mirrorless system cameras like the G series from Panasonic or the Olympus PEN series save the heavy and bulky mirrors and bring the lens mount closer to the focal place, which not only makes the system lenses smaller than their DSLR counterparts – it also leaves room for adapters for all kinds of classic DSLR lenses. Therefore, there is a huge choice of lenses available on eBay, mostly used and very cheap. Of course these lenses must, when adapted, be focused manually, and also the aperture cannot be adjusted by the camera, but the manual aperture and focus rings feel great to the hands of enthusiast – it is fun and a pleasure to turn them.

These lenses – especially when we talk about primes – are small, often very sharp and fast. Doesn’t this sound great? Couldn’t these lenses fill the gaps of fast primes that are left in the lens line-up of Sony (NEX), Panasonic and Olympus (Micro FourThirds)? Fast, sharp primes for very little money? Sweet!

But…

Continue reading Some thoughts about adapting legacy lenses (Part 1)